Tag Archives: Sci-Fi

Children Of Men (2006): A grim Future

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Alfonso Cuaron, much before he created a gripping adventure in outer space Gravity, had directed a much underrated science fiction titled Children of Men. I had watched this movie when I was in college and I guess I might not have appreciated the beauty of that work as I was sleepwalking through semester exams. Until recently, when I happened to see it again as a result of an ineluctable revival of the film online as lot many spoke about how relevant that movie is in today’s time. The impact of the movie this time on me has been much harder. Children of Men, is by far one of most frightful view of future I have seen on screen. It is frightful, because it is so close to real.

It is 2027, and it has been eighteen years since the last human child was born. Women are unable to conceive and the society, as we know it, is crumbling as humanity faces extinction. The world has collapsed and Britain, as we see on TV in the movie, is the only stable government that ‘marches on’. Being the last functional government in the world, the country is plagued by a refugee crisis. The government, as a result, is a police state and has shut down its borders, simultaneously coming down heavily on illegal immigrants, throwing them into refugee camps much similar to concentration camps of Nazi Germany. The movie begins with our protagonist Theo, getting a coffee while the news of the murder of the youngest person in the world, an 18 year old boy, is being reported in the TV news. As soon as Theo exits the shop, a bomb goes off in the very same coffee shop and we know we are in a grim, chaotic world with no escape.

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Anathem by Neal Stephenson

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Trivial Details 
With the aathemaar-u* being away for couple of weeks, I suddenly found myself with lot of free time to spare after work everyday, which was inadvertently spent watching reaction videos on YouTube and staring at ceiling contemplating about Life and universe.

After slacking away couple of days in such a manner, marinating in my own mediocrity, it became apparent to me, while watching a Hindi dubbed Telugu film ‘Daring Gundaraj’, that how pathetic last few days have been. I needed to refresh myself. Lord Tyrion’s words reverberated in my head “a mind need books like a sword needs a whetstone if it’s too keep it’s edge”. I decided to give my brain some much needed exercise by indulging in some heavy work of fiction.
Trivial Details Ends

Anathem by Neal Stephenson was zeroed in for this absurd task, solely because it was huge and it’s blob contained words like Extramuros. Few chapters into the book, it dawned on me that I have bitten more than I could chew. The alacrity quickly turned into regret as I tried to make sense of an Alien world with its own vernacular that author plunged into starting from the midday Provenor. I was like a Sline who’d been to no Suvins, getting lecture on Hylaen Theoric World, which even after being translated from ancient Orth to fluccish, was incomprehensible much like how the praxis of kineograms would have been to a Millenarial. I reckoned I’d rather have watched some spec-fic Speelies accessed from reticulum on my jeejah. Continue reading

Exclusive: Interview with Pluto

Pluto

Source: NASA

In an Exclusive, Fuzzlabs has secured a straight communication line with the Planet… err I mean Dwarf Planet Pluto. Discovered in 1930 by an American Astronomer Clyde Tombaugh, Pluto enjoyed the status of a planet until 2006 before it was unceremoniously removed from the exclusive group of Planets comprising of major players like Jupiter and Earth.

In this interview Pluto talks to us about its life, Kuiper Belt and Planet X. Continue reading

Coherence (2014): Superposition of a dinner party

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Eight Friends meet up for a dinner party on the night a huge comet is supposed to be passing by the Earth. Things get stranger and stranger from there on.

James Ward Byrkit’s Coherence is a Sci-Fi film which tries to comprehend Quantum Physics. For beginners, let me tell you, quantum physics is inherently fuzzy.

A property of the particles in quantum universe is called Superposition. As per the theory, particles don’t exist in one state or the other, but in all of its possible states at once. I should be more clearer, I know. For example once you roll a die, according to quantum theory, the die exists in all its six states simultaneously.

When we observe a quantum object, we affect its behavior. Observation breaks an object’s superposition and the universe is literally duplicated, splitting into one universe for each possible outcome from the measurement. In case of our die… Once the observation is made, the universe splits into as many as the number of possible outcomes. In this case it is six, and within each universe the player has got one of the possible numbers.

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Contact (1997) : Journey to the heart of Universe

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Brilliant performance by Jodie Foster is what makes this film must watch

Have you ever enjoyed an opening sequence of a film so much that you wished it never ended. Contact’s opening sequence is absolutely brilliant and for about two minutes you are lost in its awesomeness as the visuals zooms out of Earth into far end of the universe.

Robert Zemeckis’s (director of Forrest Gump) Contact happens to be one of my favorite science fiction films. Sure it doesn’t have lead protagonist battling in space or stranded in another planet to stay alive, it doesn’t have a magnanimous black hole into which our hero falls. Or a killer robot hellbent on eliminating our protagonist. No! but its a satisfying film to say the least. It doesn’t answer anything but help us get comfortable with our unawareness.

Towards the end Dr Ellie Arroway played by Jodie Foster, talking to a bunch of school kids, says that she will tell them one thing about the universe. That its big. Bigger than anything we ever imagined. And if its just us.. seems like an awful waste of space.

Indeed! Continue reading

Book Review: Flowers for Algernon

flowers-for-algernon-book I picked up this book randomly, no one had referred it to me, neither I had read about it anywhere. And am glad I did it because ‘’Flowers for Algernon’’ is a beautiful, beautiful book. It’s a science fiction per se, but it’s much more than that.

Charlie Gordon is a mentally disabled, thirty three year old man, with an IQ of 68 who is administered at a centre for retarded adults in University. He goes to work at a bakery sweeping floors and cleaning Toilets as a day job for which he is given daily food and a place to sleep. Professors at the university take note of Charlie as the only one among a group of half-wits to show an acute eagerness to learn and hence, they select him as the first human test subject for a surgery which claims to increase human intelligence. Charlie is very excited, he always wanted to be smart like those ‘profissirs in wite cot doing spearmaments’ and his ‘frends at the bakery’. Continue reading

Is this Universe even for real?

You could be inside a matrix. For Real

You could be inside a matrix. For Real.

SIMULATION HYPOTHESIS

Allow me to posit an hypothesis that might put even the best of you in an existential crisis. This world could just be a computer generated simulation… and your conscience might just be a product of an advanced computer intelligence.

If you have seen the film Matrix, you might be familiar with what is called as Simulated Reality. In the movie, after winning the war against the human race, highly intelligent machines with their exceptional computational power, have created a Simulated Reality for the humans by harvesting them for bio electricity. In the Reality they have created, world goes on as normal for everyone but for select few who observes glitches in the matrix and realize that they are indeed surviving in a simulated reality.

This fantastical story, if Simulation Hypothesis is to be believed, Continue reading